History is not a burden on the memory but an illumination of the soul


“I like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past.” (Thomas Jefferson).
As 2016 slips quietly behind, with little more than a few ticks on the clock (if you have one that ticks), it’s a good time to reflect on the year that has been. Lord Acton once said “History is not a burden on the memory but an illumination of the soul.” And so with that in mind, lets turn on the light that was 2016.
I’m not one to make New Year Resolutions – mostly they are just one more goal to not fulfil. And there can be plenty of them without adding another. Mostly, this year has been an interesting, although at times stressful, year. My oldest daughter, Zoe, left home to embark on a journey of learning as a University Student. That was a little stressful, but no where near as stressful as my son getting his car licence and the subsequent having to compete with him for use of the car – those of you that have sons and have¬† gone through this will know what I mean (yes, mum and dad, that includes you). And then there was the health conditions that manifested their ugly heads that made it hard to exercise, as mentioned in previously entries in this blog. I have also had ongoing problems with my voice over the last year which has made certain activities and situations very frustrating, with lack of (sometimes no) volume and sometimes a very unreliable voice. Interestingly enough, my preaching hasn’t really suffered and has actually been enhanced somewhat by including my wife in my preaching appointments – it’s a quite unexpected blessing to be able to share the pulpit with my wife!
The year just gone wasn’t all stress, though. Actually there were some great things happen this year. Eliana and I got to travel on a railway that neither of us has travelled on before from Bairnsdale in Victoria’s far east. We had some great times away camping, hiking and exploring Australia’s eastern states with visitis to Griffith, Young, Weddin Mountains National Park near Grenfell, Jindabyne and Kosciousko National Park, Bombala and the South East National Park in New South Wales (NSW), Mitta Mitta, and Omeo (and the surrounding region) in Victoria. There were also a number of day trips. I got to explore some interesting railways that have been converted to rail-trails in the Otways in Victoria’s west, and to explore parts of Victoria’s high country on my bike. And while on the subject of bicycles, I saved up enough money in 2016 to buy a brand new mountain bike this year which has made exercising and exploring heaps more fun. The last time I got a brand new bicycle was about 5 years and around 15000 – 20000 cycling kms ago.
Here are some cycling stats for 2016:
  • Distance travelled: 5615km (more than the distance between the southermost point of Tasmania and the northern most point of Cape York Peninsula, the norhernmost point on the Australian mainland, via the most direct route. And roughly half way between the 2014 and 2015 distances).
  • Amount of time to travel those kms: 262.5 hours.
  • Average speed: 21.4kph.
  • Elevation gain: 23611 metres (2.66 Mt Everests).
  • Rides: 215.
  • Average distance per ride: 26kph.
I also became a member of a Gym in 2016, the plan being to increase my upper body and arm strength –¬† something my cycling generally doesn’t increase.
On a more intellectual note, I have been learning Biblical Hebrew for the last few years, and this year saw me actually starting to read a Hebrew Bible for myself in the original language, which has really been a very slow but extremely pleasant and mind expanding experience. I have gained a much greater appreciation and love for the Bible, and the God who inspired it, as a result. And I’m looking forward to more of the same as I continue through the dynamic and descriptive world that is the Hebrew Bible in 2017. I also almost finished a Certtificate III in Fitness, which when finished will allow me to be a Gym Instructor / Fitness Trainer, something I have been interested in doing for a while. While I enjoy the “software Enginerring” / Web Programming that I currently do (and will continue to do), I have been feeling a lack of human interaction in recent years since since I started working from home. And while the computer work is helpful and necessary, I want to be able to make a personal impact on peoples lives in the area of Fitness, which is why I embarked on the fitness courses I am doing in my spare time.
A family mini-holiday in Tumut and the Snowy Mountains

A family mini-holiday in Tumut and the Snowy Mountains


With the kids on School Holidays, the possibility of some fine weather, and even an inkling that I might be able to do some bike riding in less-known locations, my darling wife organised a few days away from home as a kind of family holiday. Tumut (New South Wales, Australia) is a town nestled up against the Great Dividing Range. Being only about 2 or so hours from home made it the perfect place to base ourselves for our mini-holiday.

We had been to Tumut before, but only while passing through to other places. It has a very obvious connection with the timber industry (I counted 3 sawmills near Tumut, there are probably more), and is the last major town encountered after leaving the Hume Freeway near Adelong on the Snowy Mountains Highway before the mountain ranges themselves are encountered.

As it turned out I didn’t take the bike, so didn’t do any cycling while we were there. But every day we were there I walked or ‘ran’ varying distances. From the time we arrived to the time we left I had walked / ran about 25km! Here are some photos of the Tumut area.

Autumn Trees

Autumn Trees

River Trail

Old Bridge across Tumut along the River Trail

River trail

Most of the fam on the River Trail

River Trail

River Trail

Rotary Pioneer Park pond

Rotary Pioneer Park pond

Rotary Pioneer Park pond

Pelicans on Rotary Pioneer Park pond

Tumut River

Tumut River

Tumut River

Tumut River

Tumut River

Tumut River

The morning of second day we were there we explored Adelong and the nearby Adelong Falls and Gold Mill ruins. What a fascinating place it was. Lots of photos of how things were and we had the vistas before us to see how it is today.

Adelong Falls and Gold Mill ruins

Adelong Gold Mill ruins

Adelong Falls and Gold Mill walk

Adelong Falls and Gold Mill walk

Adelong Falls and Gold Mill ruins

Adelong Gold Mill ruins

Adelong Falls and Gold Mill ruins

Adelong Gold Mill ruins

Adelong Falls scenery

Adelong Falls scenery

Adelong Falls and Gold Mill ruins

Adelong Gold Mill ruins

Adelong Falls and Gold Mill ruins

Adelong Gold Mill ruins

Adelong Falls and Gold Mill ruins

Adelong Gold Mill ruins

Adelong Falls and Gold Mill walk

The Fam on the Adelong Falls and Gold Mill walk

Adelong Falls and Gold Mill walk

Adelong Falls and Gold Mill walk

Adelong - old rock crusher

Adelong – old rock crusher in centre of town

Adelong - old mining skip

Adelong – old mining skip

After lunch we decided to go for a scenic drive from Adelong and Talbingo via Batlow. We got through Batlow ok, but the road between Batlow and Talbingo was closed with a ‘Detour’ sign suggesting there was another way, so after travelling to the end of Snubba Road (which became Snubba ‘goat track’, and then Hume and Hovell Walking Track), we headed back to where the detour signs pointed and travelled for quite a long distance (we estimated at least 40km) till we got to another road closed sign and nearby was a signpost saying “Talbingo 16km, Batlow 15km”, so we went the long way around to no-where. But we did see some interesting things on the way.

Batlow Literary Institute

Batlow Literary Institute

Echidna, Snubba Rd

Echidna, Snubba Rd, between Batlow an Talbingo

Goanna, Lake Blowering Area

Goanna, Lake Blowering Area, between Batlong and Talbingo

Hume & Hovell Lookout on SnubbaRd

Hume & Hovell Lookout on Snubba Rd between Batlow and Talbingo.

Plaque at Hume & Hovel Lookout on Snubba Rd

Commemorative Plaque at Hume & Hovel Lookout on Snubba Rd

The 3rd day we explored the Yarrangobilly Caves, which is nestled in a valley a few kilometres off the Snowy Mountains Highway. There are a number of caves – we explored 3 of them (2 with a tour guide and 1 as a self-guided tour). And there were some entrances to other caves visible on the walking tracks too. There is also a Thermal Pool which is heated from rain water that percolates down many hundreds of meters into the earth’s crust then forced back to the surface as a warm spring.

Yarrongobilly Caves

Yarrongobilly Caves – Cave House

Yarrongobilly Caves

Yarrongobilly Caves visitors center from Bluff Lookout

Yarrongobilly Caves

Yarrongobilly Caves – cliffs

Yarrongobilly Caves

Yarrongobilly Caves – cave formations

Yarrongobilly Caves

Yarrongobilly Caves – cave formations

Yarrongobilly Caves

Yarrongobilly Caves – cave formations

Yarrongobilly Caves

Yarrongobilly Caves – cave formations

Yarrongobilly Caves

Yarrongobilly Caves – cave formations – pond

Yarrongobilly Caves

Yarrongobilly Caves – cave formations

Yarrongobilly Caves

Yarrongobilly Caves – cliff faces

Yarrongobilly Caves

Yarrongobilly Caves – decending down into one of the caves

Yarrongobilly Caves

Yarrongobilly Caves – cave formations

Yarrongobilly Caves

Yarrongobilly Caves – cave formations

Yarrongobilly Caves

Yarrongobilly Caves – cave formations

Yarrongobilly Caves

Yarrongobilly Caves – cave formations – reflection in a pond.

Yarrongobilly Caves

Yarrongobilly Caves – thermal pool

Yarrongobilly Caves

Yarrongobilly Caves – thermal pool

Yarrongobilly Caves

Yarrongobilly Caves – rock formations.

Yarrongobilly Caves

Yarrongobilly Caves – rock formations.

Yarrongobilly Caves

Yarrongobilly Caves – tree lined walk.

Yarrongobilly Caves

Yarrongobilly Caves – Track to Glory Cave entrance

Yarrongobilly Caves - entrance to Glory Cave (self guided tour)

Yarrongobilly Caves – entrance to Glory Cave (self guided tour)

Then we continued on to Cabramurra for tea / dinner. We had a reason for going to Cabramurra – in the past we have had breakfast and lunch at this highest of Australian towns, and we wanted to complete the meal cycle by having tea / dinner there as well. After a tea / dinner of soup and bread, then some dessert, it was back into the car to return to Tumut so I could log into my online Hebrew class. I realised on the way back to Tumut that the class would probably be starting at 7pm rather than 8pm as Daylight Savings had ended. We arrived back at the cabin about 6 minutes late, but the class was experiencing some technical difficulties (no sound) which were only resolved a minute or two after I logged on.

The next day, after I went for a ‘run’ and we packed our sutff and cleaned the cabin, we headed for the familiarity of home.