Old Friends?


Normally we think of friends as being those fellow human beings that we have a bond of friendship with, people we have something in common with. And certainly those fellow human beings are friends. But maybe friends can be more than just human beings. Dogs are often referred to as “mans best friend”, so maybe other non-human things can be friends too in some way? When I was growing up in the foothills of the Dandenong Ranges in eastern suburbs of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia), my dad and I would sometimes spend a Sabbath afternoon exploring the national parks / state forests not far from where we lived. My parents still live there, and it is good to go back from time to time and experience the fond memories of days gone by, days that somehow seemed to be more relaxed, less stressful.

Interesting gum tree

Interesting gum tree

Over the New South Wales September 2014 School Holidays I had an opportunity to go on a mini-holiday with Eliana, my youngest offspring, to visit my parents and re-discover some old friends that I haven’t connected with in a long time. At church on Sabbath I had an opportunity to catch up with a number of ‘old friends’ (‘old’ not referring to their age, but rather how long they have been friends!). In the afternoon after lunch mum and Eliana went for a drive and I took the opportunity to do some hiking in the nearby forests. The plan was to hike from my parents’ house along Paddys Track and Neumanns Track to Grants Picnic Ground in Kallista then loop around via Coles Ridge Track and Welch Track back to my parents house through the Dandenong Ranges National Park. It had been many many years since I last walked that loop – at least 30 years I think. Some things stay the same and some things change. Near the start of the walk, just past the bridge that spans the Monbulk Creek there is a location called Jack the Miners in Selby. I have memories of going there for family picnics when I was young, and of it being a big expanse of open space with nicely mowed grass. But today it looks like the photo below.

Jack the Miners, near the Monbulk Creek bridge and Paddy Track.

Jack the Miners, near the Monbulk Creek bridge and Paddy Track.

The obvious source of the name would be that it is named after a fellow named Jack who was a miner. And I have heard that there was once a hut there. But I also read that there was a timber tramway through the area at some point in the early 20th century that ran through the area, and Welch Track seems to follow that tramway for at least part of it’s distance. So Jack the Miners might have been a timber storage area or something else at some point as well. There is no real evidence of what it was used for evident today. So exactly where the name came from or what the clearing was used is not entirely clear. The track itself seemed little changed from what I remembered of it.

Paddy Track joins Jack the Miners and Neumann Track.

Paddy Track joins Jack the Miners and Neumann Track.

I remember the hill in the photo above a bit too well! But I didn’t remember quite how long it was. But in spite of doing virtually no excersize for the previous month I still managed to get to the top of the hill with only a little breathless-ness by the time I got to the top. At the top I heard some lyrebirds – at least I was pretty sure they were lyrebirds. Lyrebirds have been known to mimic all sorts of sounds including steam trains, car horns, chainsaws, someone chopping wood, and all sorts of other sounds. They look a little like a peacock, especially with their tail fanned out.

Lyrebird

Lyrebird

And it must have been breeding season as it was doing it’s dance and song to try and attract a mate. I managed to get reasonably close to the lyrebird I heard, but before I could take a photo of it close up it would scamper off further into the forest. I managed to get this photo of it’s mound.

Lyrebird Mound

Lyrebird Mound

About this time I saw a fellow walker who was walking in the same direction as me. It turned out he was from Ringwood and was spending a day hiking in the forest. For the rest of the walk into Grants Picnic Ground we talked about all sorts of things including religion (he was a Christadelphian), the state religion (Australian Rules Football) and the worship in the temple of sport happening that very same day (I still don’t know who won, but I suspect the Hawks going by the shear number of Hawks colors flying from cars, trains) and how that meant less people in the forest and more serenity for those who were walking in them, our different walking experiences, different places worth a visit (he had walked in the Little Desert near Dimboola, Victoria), the history of the tracks we were walking on, etc.

Dead but majestic looking tree

Dead but majestic looking tree

At Grants Picnic Ground we parted company and I continued along the Coles Ridge Track. Some months ago I purchased a Shofar (probably best described as a rams horn trumpet). The Shofar was used to sound a warning of attack, to call warriors to arms, to call people to religious feasts, and to announce important events. I took it on the walk with me and along Coles Ridge Track, and in a nice quiet spot I got it out and started ‘playing’ it. The echo of it’s sounds in the forest was pretty cool to listen to!

Crimson Rosellas

Crimson Rosellas

Then I continued on to Welch Track, through Jack the Miners again and back to my parents house. Are you are still wondering about the ‘non-human friends’ idea I talked about at the start of this post? In this particular case, the ‘friend’ would be the forest surrounds – the sort of friend that expects nothing of you except maybe a visit every once in a while. The sort of friend who continues to surprise with new experiences, while evoking old memories of past time spent together. And while walking in the forest, it’s hard to forget the ultimate friend, the “friend that sticks closer than a brother” (Proverbs 18:24), a Divine friend who guides our steps and watches over our path (Psalms 23), who knows our innermost secrets (both good and bad) and remains the most stedfast, truest and loyal friend.

(For some more info on the weekend, see: http://www.jimsmodeltrains.ws/blog.php?id=390 .)

Mountains to the Bay


Today was the first real deviation from the planned cycling touring holiday itinerary. I completed the Great Southern Rail Trail like I planned although a little earlier. The original plan was to then ride the Grand Ridge Rail Trail (starting at Mirboo North), but as I was already back at my parents house I decided to do a bike ride from their house to somewhere instead.

While riding the Warby Rail Trail I met a fellow who said that the Blind Creek Trail went all the way from the Dandenong Ranges to Carrum, and on the strength of the information he gave me I decided to attempt to ride from my parents house to Carrum (or wherever else I might have arrived at) on Port Phillip Bay. The trail passes through various natural features.

Mt Dandenong

Mt Dandenong from near Knox City

Jells Lake / Park

Jells Lake / Park

Wetlands near Dandenong

Wetlands near Dandenong

Wetlands near Dandenong

Wetlands near Dandenong

The trails between Belgrave and Knox City were your fairly standard suburban bike or shared trails with housing estates surrounding it and various other public amenities, parklands, wetlands and sporting fields. Once on the Eastlink trail south of Knox City the scenery changed quite noticably with the trail right next to the Eastlink Tollway in some places, or not far from it. The scenery was also a lot more open from where I joined the Eastlink trail, the more so the closer to Carrum the trail got. The trails were beautiful to ride on, mostly of asphalt or concrete, with a 5km or so section approaching Carrum where the trail was small stones. The architecture and man-made features along the trails was interesting too, and so I have included some photos below.

Cycling art near Knox City

Cycling art near Knox City

Eastlink signature orange seperator

Eastlink signature orange seperator

Eastlink visual features

Eastlink visual features

Eastlink visual features

Eastlink visual features

Eastlink visual features

Eastlink visual features

Eastlink visual features

Eastlink visual features

Eastlink visual features

Eastlink visual features – A whopping big bird shaped sculpture!

What is it?

What is it?

There was an unknown element of ‘danger’ on all the rides I did so far this week and I only realised it today. I noticed that my front tyre was a little flatter than I liked, and so I got out the small tyre pump I brought along and noticed that it was broken. So all this time I was riding with a broken tyre pump! I’m sure thankful that I didn’t get a puncture on one of my rides, especially a long way from the car as I could have put a new tube in the rim ok, but would have had no way of pumping it up. So today I pumped up the tyre using Dad’s car tyre pump, and prayed for no punctures. I even figured that having 2 spare tyre tubes was fairly pointless too, so left one behind and added a windcheater into the pack instead.

Bridge between Dandenong and Carrum

Bridge between Dandenong and Carrum

Dandenong Creek near Patterson Lakes

Dandenong Creek near Patterson Lakes

Pelican in Dandenong Creek

Pelican in Dandenong Creek near Patterson Lakes

Patterson Lakes Marina

Patterson Lakes Marina

The ride was not only puncture free, but apart from a short stretch where I seemed to lose the trail, was totally problem free. So I got from Belgrave to the Bay, Port Phillip Bay that is, without incident. I got on the train at Carrum, and within an hour or two I was back at my parents house, just in time for a slightly late lunch.

Where the Creek meets the Bay

Where the Creek meets the Bay at Carrum

For GPS data for this ride, go here: http://www.strava.com/activities/118339181 .